What Is A Soccer Own Goal

By Woodland Soccer Team •  Updated: 07/21/22 •  6 min read

We may earn money or products from the companies mentioned in this post.

What is a soccer own goal? This is a question that many people ask, but not everyone knows the answer. In this blog post, we will discuss the different types of own goals, as well as how to score one.

What Is A Soccer Own Goal?

A soccer’s own goal is when a player accidentally scores on their team. This can happen in several ways, but the most common is when a player tries to clear the ball away from their own goal and instead ends up kicking it into the net. Own goals usually happen when there is confusion or panic on the defensive end, and the player doesn’t have time to think about where they’re kicking the ball.

While own goals are fairly common in soccer, they can be extremely costly. In some cases, an own goal can decide the outcome of a match. This is why you’ll often see players on the opposing team celebrating wildly after an own goal is scored; they know that they just got a huge break.

Different Types Of Own Goals:

There are three different types of own goals. Each type of own goal has different implications and can be costly to a team in different ways.

Let’s take a look at each type of own goal in more detail.

A Defender Scoring An Own Goal:

The most common type of own goal is when a defender scores one. This usually happens when a team is under pressure and the defenders are trying to clear the ball away from their goal. The problem is that sometimes they can clear the ball into their net instead.

This type of own goal can be very costly as it usually means that the team has conceded a goal. It can also be demoralizing for the defenders as they have made a mistake that has cost their team.

A Goalkeeper Scoring An Own Goal:

The second type of own goal is when a goalkeeper scores one. This usually happens when the goalkeeper tries to catch or punch the ball away and misses. The problem is that sometimes they can miss the ball and it goes into their net.

This type of own goal can be very costly as it usually means that the team has conceded a goal. It can also be demoralizing for the goalkeeper as they have made a mistake that has cost their team.

An Attacker Scoring An Own Goal:

The third and final type of own goal is when an attacker scores one. This usually happens when the attacker is trying to shoot at the goal and misses. The problem is that sometimes they can miss the ball and it goes into their net.

This type of own goal can be very costly as it usually means that the team has conceded a goal. It can also be demoralizing for the attacker as they have made a mistake that has cost their team.

What Results In An Own Goal?

To score their own goal, the player must shoot or deflect the ball into their net. Own goals can be scored from anywhere on the field, but are most commonly seen when defenders attempt to clear balls that are dangerously close to their goal line.

Own goals often occur as a result of miscommunication between defenders, or when a player miscalculates the strength or direction of their clearance. In some cases, an own goal may be scored intentionally as a last-ditch effort to prevent the opposing team from scoring.

While own goals are relatively rare in soccer, they can have a significant impact on the outcome of a match. An own goal typically awards the opposing team a goal, and can often shift the momentum of a game. In some instances, an own goal may even decide the final result.

Despite their often decisive nature, their own goals are generally considered unlucky by both players and fans. In many cases, the player who scores their own goal is booed by their supporters and may even be jeered by the opposing team’s fans.

Famous Own Goals In History:

While own goals are not an everyday occurrence, they do happen from time to time in even the most high-profile matches. Here are some of the most famous own goals in soccer history:

In the 2014 World Cup, Uruguay’s Luis Suarez scored an unfortunate own goal against Italy in the group stage.
In a 2013 Champions League match, Bayern Munich’s Dante scored an own goal that proved to be the difference in a close match against Arsenal.

In 2012, Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic scored their own goal against Liverpool in the final minutes of a Premier League match. The goal resulted in a draw for the two sides.
Manchester United’s Rio Ferdinand scored their own goal in a 2010 Premier League match against Everton.
In 2006, Chelsea’s Asier del Horno was sent off for scoring an own goal against Barcelona in the Champions League.

While these are some of the most famous own goals in history, there have been many, many more over the years. There is even an annual “Own Goal of the Season” award given out in England!

What Is The Difference Between An Own Goal And A Deflection?

An own goal is when a player kicks or heads the ball into their net. A deflection is when a player kicks or heads the ball and it goes off another player, resulting in a goal.

Own goals are often seen as more unlucky than deflective goals, however, they can be just as important. In some cases, an own goal may be the only way that a team can score against particularly strong opposition.

There are often goals that are often seen as more unlucky than deflective goals, however, they can be just as important. In some cases, an own goal may be the only way that a team can score against particularly strong opposition.

Final Words:

That’s all about what is a soccer own goal! In soccer, an own goal occurs when a player accidentally scores on their team. This can be a devastating moment for any player, as it often results in the other team taking the lead. Own goals can happen due to several reasons, such as miscommunication between teammates, poor positioning, or simply bad luck.

Woodland Soccer Team

We're a team of soccer experts, fans, coaches, and players. The world's game is our game.